Sunday, August 18, 2013

iAdvocate - tools for parents

iAdvocate by Syracuse University

iAdvocate is a FREE advocacy tool for parents developed by the Syracuse University’s School of Education. The app aims to give parents the tools to advocate for their child within a school setting. There are three main areas: responses, strategies and resources. I found the Responses section to be the most user friendly, as it has a list of statements the school may have made, such as “Your child’s behavior is too disruptive to be managed in the general classroom”. Clicking on a statement brings up a response to that statement and links to strategies and resources that may help. While not all of the information contained in the app is relevant to parents in countries other than the US, the majority of the strategies and responses could be used.

If you would like to download iAdvocate (Free, iPhone/iPad 2x), please support us by using our link:


From iTunes:
"The goal of iAdvocate is to share and develop specific strategies with parents for working collaboratively with a school team to improve their children’s education. iAdvocate uses problem-based learning strategies, simulations, and provides contextual access resources to build parental advocacy skills and knowledge.

iAdvocate provides parents with both information and most importantly, strategies in regards to their educational rights and getting their child’s needs met. The goal of iAdvocate is to share and develop specific strategies with parents for working collaboratively with a school team to improve their children’s education and to provide the most inclusive and meaningful educational environment for students with disabilities.

iAdvocate contains three sections: strategies, a compilation of approaches that parents can pursue as advocates; resources, which lists and, where possible, links to such references as laws, books, articles, web sites, video presentations, and organizations that provide information on inclusive education; and, responses, which features simulated interactions, such as replies to common statements made by school professionals regarding services and accommodations for children."


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Odd Socks Mummy wants to be the best advocate for her children.

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